How you doin’, Kamaljeet?

Jay Sean, the brown (whom we’ve known about for years) who crooned “Down”, was on The Wendy Williams show two days ago. Behold:

After he performed “Down” and “Do you remember , Williams exclaimed to her guest, “You are, STUNNING!” She followed up with “You’re exotic and spicy, what is your background??”. Mr. Jhooti let her know that his “heritage” was Indian and immediately clarified that he did not, in fact, live in a “wigwam”, i.e. that he wasn’t THAT kind of Indian.

Other scintillating bits from the show included Jay swatting down rumors about Ashley Tisdale, a mention of how the New York Post named him one of NYC’s most eligible bachelors and Sean’s confirmation that he’s already got a bird. So all you single ladies (all the single ladies)…and single men (all the single men), if you were in to him…you’re tatti out of luck. :)

66 thoughts on “How you doin’, Kamaljeet?

  1. Different people have different pet peeves. For example, some may think it’s awkward and tacky to trumpet one’s charitable endeavors. It’s good to help those in need, but please be aware of how weird it is to see a white person showing off the poor brown children she sponsors via her blog’s sidebar. All I could think of after clicking your link was “White Woman’s Burden”.

    Indian children suffer from malnutrition at a higher rate than any population on the planet – far more than sub-saharan africa. Maybe if more desis focused on feeding starving kids in the homeland and their plight instead of having the balls to take cheap shots at someone from the outside trying to help you would have some more credibilty. From what I can see on the blog, she is helping those kids – without any political or other agenda.

    Maybe as long as you can walk around well fed its worth a couple dozen 5 year old skeletal macacas running around India.

  2. “From what I can see on the blog, she is helping those kids – without any political or other agenda.”

    Thank you Anon.. The reason I have them on my blog sidebar is two-fold: One is that at a recent point (when I was unemployed) I found out one of my students needed a tutor (she had been repeating second grade) and so I did a fundraiser for her because I did not have the money at the time to help her myself and I wanted her to get the help she needed ASAP.

    The second reason is that a lot of people I have talked to say they that they want to sponsor a child or donate money to education but they don’t ‘trust’ the different sponsoring agencies, etc. They think they are scamming you, etc. I have sponsored kids through Children International since 2004 and visited one of my kids, so I can see first hand that they are not scamming me. By sharing this, other people may finally decide to take the plunge and sponsor a child somewhere. The child doesn’t have to be brown– the reason I chose Indian children was because I visit there a lot and have a greater chance of being able to visit them at some point. Also two out of three of them speak Urdu/Hindi (one speaks Bengali) so when I do visit them I can talk to them easily. (or when I write them letters). This would not be the case if I chose a child from another country.

    Anyways, not awkward at all, I find it interesting that Wendy calling you “exotic” seems to make you less angry than me sponsoring some kids education. weird.

  3. I did volunteer work in the Bay Area for an organization called “CRY” to raise money to educate poor children in India. Later found out that most of the money was not getting to the children but was being eaten by bureaucrats. Now the organization calls itself “Vibha”.

  4. Brij– I think CRY (Child Rights and You) still exists… there are a ton of organizations that work in education in India, and it is important to research them first and make sure the money is getting where it is supposed to.. additionally some are more efficient than others at meeting their goals. Children International is good in some ways– it is easy to communicate with the children you are sponsoring them, and to do extra projects if you want (like income generating projects for the family, or help improve the house, etc). It is also easy to see where your money goes– you will always get a letter, and if it is an extra donation you will get pictures showing what was purchased for the family. The downside is that they still spend a lot of money in the U.S.– the C.E.O. makes quite a nice sum and I think there are still many ways for them to cut back on costs here… but overall I am pretty happy with the organization. Another plus side is that they do not have any religious agenda, which many child sponsorship programs do.

    There are also many smaller organizations that do similar things. Barakat has schools in Pakistan, India, and Afghanistan. Nahni Kali sponsors girls education in India, and is very inexpensive to sponsor a child through them (though I have not tried it, so I am not sure how good the org. is). Akshaya Patra has an amazing program to feed kids in gov’t schools healthy lunches. (and it is growing quite large very quickly).

    Anyways, Brij, it is true that it is difficult to ensure your money is being used properly and to the maximum benefit of others… that is one of the reasons I choose to share information about my sponsored kids (besides the fact that I converse with them regularly and have a relationship with them… I’m sure people here like to share pictures of their children, nieces and nephews, etc at work, on their profile. etc, I feel the same way sharing about my sponsored kids. I am proud of them, I think they are great kids, and I don’t think sponsoring children should be secretive or shameful).

  5. the C.E.O. makes quite a nice sum and I think there are still many ways for them to cut back on costs here.
    How else is an organization supposed to hire a top-notch CEO? Maybe this is self-serving, but I'd like to think that people shouldn't have to dramatically diminish their income just to do good work. Especially not when an equivalently educated guy can go become an I-Banker, make a boat-load of money, and then become a prominent enough funding source to influence a non-profit on his own to a degee that I, an equivalently educated and talented guy on the inside can't. Beyond that, good managerial talent doesn't come cheap. So if you insist on paying peanuts, you're going to end up with a poorly managed organization. You could at least upgrade to cashews. 
    

    I realize people donate to help hungry kids rather than to send the children of well-heeled bureaucrats to good colleges, but that’s just a fact of life. If you don’t let the people with a passion for this stuff actually make a living from it, you’re going to reduce the number of good people willing to work on it and consequentially, the number of hungry kids who get fed.

  6. Hey Yoga Fire, didn’t you work for http://www.brahmin.com a few years back? Did you work for the internet but not get paid? I recall a huge debt accumulation on your part and a near abuse level of “असतो मा सद्गमय” inculcation. Your spiritual debt is real, brother and your karma is idling.

  7. “How else is an organization supposed to hire a top-notch CEO? Maybe this is self-serving, but I’d like to think that people shouldn’t have to dramatically diminish their income just to do good work.”

    YogaFire, I do agree with you to an extent… they should be given a good salary for their job, but at the same time, I think there should be some kind of limit. Your reasoning is exactly the reasoning that Children International gives for the salary they give their C.E.O., etc. Obviously we want someone who is good at what they do and committed to their job, but I mean, when is the salary good and when is it too much? Of course, the same could be said for C.E.O.s of most organization- nonprofit or profit.

    And in the end, I do choose to support Children International, regardless of this fact, because of other factors about the organization which are important to me.

  8. LinZi,

    Generally speaking, it is rarely executive talent that accounts for the majority of an organization’s costs– particularly non-profits. The focus on salaries and the hand-wringing about paying people “too much” is usually an exercise in ignoring the forest and the trees to stare at a patch of moss. What we usually find at non-profits is inefficiency at any number of levels that far outstrips the costs of hiring capable people. I’d much rather pay the CEO of some big NPO/NGO a market-rate salary and focus on the likely costlier systemic problems than try to fix things with sub-standard leadership.

  9. Hey Yoga Fire, didn’t you work for http://www.brahmin.com a few years back? Did you work for the internet but not get paid? I recall a huge debt accumulation on your part and a near abuse level of “असतो मा सद्गमय” inculcation. Your spiritual debt is real, brother and your karma is idling.

    I can’t even tell if this is funny or not. . .

  10. I also must add that most of the people who you want leading an NGO/NPO are people who understand money and understand how to get money. In other words: people of rare qualifications. A skilled leader can, by directing the organization well, pay off huge dividends. It’s an overly simplistic hypothetical, but are you better off with the $100K/year CEO who brings in $2m in grants, or the $200K/year CEO who brings in $3m in grants? Or even just $2.5? Either way, you ended up with more money net the CEO’s salary.

    Now, of course it’s true that not everyone who you pay more will pay off; that’s a gamble you have to take in hiring anyone. However, when you have the choice of someone with a proven track record of bringing in significant amounts of money in either the for-profit or not-for-profit world, you are usually better off paying his “too high” salary simply for the dividends that his skills will bring you.

  11. Supporting this guy just because he is ” brown” (highly problematic term) is the same idiotic thinking as the prejudice upper class that our “struggle” as ethnics always seems to be against.

    Common South Asian Diaspora, just because this kid is brown doesnt mean he needs to be embraced.

    Lets look beyond skin color, and if not, lets stop complaining when someone else points our’s out to us.

  12. —I have not seen a single fat chic from the south

    LOL!

    They wait until they’re married

    LOL!

  13. Lets look beyond skin color, and if not, lets stop complaining when someone else points our’s out to us.

    WORD.

  14. WHY DOES THIS SITE ALWAYS SHOW SO MUCH IGNORANCE NOT EVERYONE WHO IS EAST INDIAN HAS FUCKING BROWN SKIN INDIA IS HOME TO HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS OF RACES AND ETHNIC GROUPS FROM WHITE TO YELLOW TO BLACK NOT EVERYONE IS FUCKING BROWN SKINNED IM SICK OF PEOPLE STEROTYPING EAST INDIANS WITH BROWN SKIN