The first desi in the Oval Office?

Relax, this post has nothing to do with Bobby Jindal. Banish the thought and just bear with me for a moment. Last week, after one of the candidates I was eyeing as the potential recipient of my vote made a monumental policy blunder (which made me question everything about this candidate), I started giving a closer look to another candidate who had more sensible and educated things to say on the same issue. And that is when I decided that it was finally time (after months of my teenage-like infatuation where I contemplated the perfect post that might get her to take notice of me) to write about an awesome potential development that would take place IF Hillary Clinton goes on to win the White House. I’m talking about that goddess beautiful and capable assistant of hers, Huma Abedin. Huma currently serves as Clinton’s “body man,” similar to the character of Charlie on the show The West Wing. If she doesn’t go on to become the Chief of Staff, she would certainly remain one of Clinton’s closest advisors, with daily access to the Oval Office. From an article I first read in April:

Last June, under an oppressive sun, at a rally to save the Niagara military base at the University of Buffalo, all of New York’s top politicians–George Pataki, Chuck Schumer, Hillary Clinton–poured sweat.

Yet there was exactly one member of the wilting delegation who managed, somehow, to stay cool: Hillary Clinton’s mysterious, glamorous and eerily unflappable aide de camp, Huma Abedin.

“It was like 110 degrees outside,” recalled the source, a political aide who asked to remain anonymous. “We were all just pouring down with sweat. But I have this distinct memory of Huma traipsing in in this blue pantsuit–it was like this wool pantsuit–not a bead of sweat on her brow, not a hair out of place, with everything perfectly organized in her Yves Saint Laurent handbag.”

That sort of fantastical, supernaturally tinged tale is not unusual. Indeed, in the insular world of New York and D.C. politics, Huma Abedin has become a sort of mythical figure. [Link]

<

p>Huma was born in Michigan to an Indian father and a Pakistani mother. She interned at the White House in the mid-90s and graduated from GW. If she goes on to become Chief of Staff it is entirely possible that she could broker a lasting peace in South Asia by helping to end the Kashmiri conflict. I’m just saying, if I was at the negotiation table I’d commit to any concession she proposed. Let’s give peace a chance.

“I think she has special powers,” said public-radio broadcaster Katia Dunn, who recently crossed paths with Ms. Abedin and Mrs. Clinton at a café on Capitol Hill.

Ms. Dunn explained that she had heard about the “cult of Huma,” but had never met her. “All of a sudden, I turn around and there was this woman I now know to be Huma. And it wasn’t just that she was gorgeous–she did just sort of have this presence. She stopped me in my tracks for a second…” [Link]

<

p>

<

p> For those of you who think that the “special powers” quote above is an exaggeration, check out this clip. She is as agile as a secret service agent in protecting Ms. Clinton from the attacking flags (apparently Clinton forgot to wear a flag pin on her lapel and the flags in the audience were really pissed). At the end of clip you can see her calming down some of the flags:

“This might seem too over-saccharine, but I love Huma,” said Oscar de la Renta, who is a personal friend and intensely loyal supporter of the Clintons. The legendary designer was speaking to The Observer on the phone from his compound in the Dominican Republic. He has known her for nearly a decade. Indeed, he noted, Ms. Abedin has actually been a guest at his island home. He described her as “discreet,” “loyal,” “beautiful” and “half-Pakistani.”

“She is an unbelievably feminine and gentle person, but at the same time she can accomplish so much,” offered Mr. de la Renta. He recalled that she had great style, but hastened to point out that “she’s a Muslim” and “she’s very conservative.”

“I always say I don’t want to die without seeing [Huma] in a strapless dress,” he said, with a laugh. But did the dapper dressmaker know, say, where his dream girl grew up?… [Link]

<

p>I never thought I’d have so much in common with Oscar de la Renta. Who knew? There are rumors that she once dated John Cusack for a while. That is not conservative. But honey, didn’t you watch High Fidelity? That bum is a commitment-phobe and it was always going to lead to a failed relationship. I’m not like that. I also love politics and believe in government service so we’d have a lot to talk about.

<

p>Now, as for the other rumors, I find them just disgusting. It is a combination of misogyny and racism that motivates the spreading of innuendo that Clinton is having a lesbian affair with her Muslim aide. It is dirty politics at its absolute worst (even worse than what happened to McCain in 2000). Some segment of our society (in both parties) just can’t accept one strong woman working with another without feeling threatened by it.

<

p>I’d like to conclude this post with what I predict would be some notable developments should Clinton win the Presidency and Huma accompany her to the White House:

<

p>1) Secret Service budget would be increased exponentially as it would need to staff up because of all the brown men that would suddenly become interested in seeing Clinton speak at events.

<

p>2) Peace between India and Pakistan. How could two nations that combined to form a Huma keep fighting?

<

p>3) Raghubir “the foil” Goyal would ask the White House Press Secretary, “ummm. so, how’s Huma? Did she say anything about me?” at every press briefing.

<

p>4) The Saudis would lower oil prices (Huma grew up there and could probably place a call to make it happen)

<

p>5) USINPAC would suddenly become Islamaphilic.

<

p>6) Huma action figures by Kridana.com

<

p>7) SM blogger Abhi would quit SM to run Huma fan club website

8) Secret Service would investigate Abhi…again.

150 thoughts on “The first desi in the Oval Office?

  1. i skimmed through the comments, so i apologize if this was already discussed; but does anyone else find de la renta’s comments kind of annoying? ““She is an unbelievably feminine and gentle person, but at the same time she can accomplish so much”. how exactly are feminity and gentleness exclusive from accomplishment? why the need for the word but? maybe it seems like i’m overanalyzing, but the subtlety of words is powerful…

  2. I’ve noticed that political discussion about Hillary Clinton or democrats brings out the usual suspects on SM and it devolves into childish innuendo.

  3. 3) Abhi isn’t available during the day, so if you pose questions to him, expect responses after COB

    After COB I read some comments that annoyed me (due to their ignorance). Then I thought, the display of ignorance isn’t enough to cause anger at someone, so I went to my yoga class in hopes that my eventual responses would be tempered by inner calmness and I would not become too attached the the “outcome” of this “debate.”

    I am happy to see that Obama has taken the libertarian turn of wanting to cut down on taxpayer funding of (non-miliatary-related) NASA projects, in order to let the private sector in, to the extent that such projects make sense at all.

    Libertarianism will always fail to rule a society. People always want other peoples projects to be cut. When it comes to their own stuff or their aspirations or inspirations they suddenly don’t feel so Libertarian.

    Abhi, the Constellation Program ain’t everything. Let’s hear what Obama and his people have in mind overall for fully fledged space and NASA policies before we go rushing into Ms. Clinton’s camp because of Huma, and expect Huma to fix or eradicate the LOC. I suspect Ms. Clinton is just waffling by throwing out shadow soundbites about how wonderful the Constellation program is, considering it has stalled. After all, Hillary ‘s clearly on the way to keeping the Iraq war going on and on, which will make make progress in space exploration impossible anyway. Plus. don’t you think developing solar energy first is more expedient than getting to Mars?

    I beg to differ. It all depends on where you stand. To me, the Constellation Program is everything. Obama’s policy on this issue is on record and was widely described as imbecilic (and for good reason if you understand U.S. Space Policy and Strategic objectives, not to mention the 10,000s of jobs his “plan” would cost. And where do you get your information from when you say the program has “stalled?” That is totally false. Also, the Constellation Program is not primarily (or even secondarily) about getting to Mars. That’s the whole point as to why Obama’s policy on this issue is so incredibly ignorant. Furthermore, it would never pass the House or the Senate. Space has wide bipartisan support.

    ARE YOU MAD?? I mean, I can totally see how investing in space exploration is more important than reforming a crumbling education system. After all, why fix things when we can launch illiterate kids into orbit? Can we also divert funding from the safety of currently deployed forces in favor of a system with a really cool name?

    I’ll tell you what. Let’s do away with all museums while we are at it. We could feed hungry children with that money. Also, lets get rid of the symphony. Who will think of the children? Taking money from one of the biggest educators of children (especially science and math) to fund the technical education of children (who now don’t have a cool job to aspire to) is plainly stupid.

    Now I will center myself again before going to bed. Goodnight.

  4. Abhi,

    Fair point about museums–and cert. basic science is also a public good that needs some public financing (though public financing of symphonies is more problematic, I think), but, while I’m far from an expert on this topic for sure, isn’t there a fair amount of sensible, informed opinion that basic science in space can be done much more cost-effectively with unmanned flights–so, to the extent Constellation Project includes expensive manned stuff, I’m not so sure it’s crazy to say, “Feds should cut it out, and leave the manned stuff to the private sector.”
    Or, I don’t know, maybe my head is just messed up because I feel guilty for finding “Obama girl” to be cuter than Huma . . . .

    ;-)

  5. Abhi, there’s this guy, Ferris Valyn, on the Obama site, since I’m there anyway, and yours above linked to his a couple of clicks away. Ferris Valyn also says in dailykos that the shuttle replacement from Constellation won’t fly until 2014 – 2016, which is what I meant by stalled. Shouldn’t NASA/the Const.Project have scheduled something to take over manned flight without interruption as soon as the shuttles were retired? Meanwhile, when I first heard of SpaceDev it was a nanocap, looking for promo writers, even one such as me, to lure investors (my jaw dropped, I was not hired), and it looked neat but nutty, and now look how it’s grown in just the past three years.

    I just think that this guy is not fueled by the same juice as this gal.

  6. Shouldn’t NASA/the Const.Project have scheduled something to take over manned flight without interruption as soon as the shuttles were retired?

    You are absolutely right, and the head of NASA all but yelled at Congress a few weeks ago calling that “gap” irresponsible of them. But there is an important detail you are neglecting. NASA can’t do a single thing on its own. Congress has to fund and direct all of NASA’s activities. If NASA doesn’t get money to have something ready after the shuttle then why should it get your blame?

    By the way, I was at the first ever private launch into space which took place a few years ago in the Mohave desert (Spaceship 1). You can support both private and public. The United States is the only nation in the world capable of something right now. Too create a situation (like Obama is proposing) where we would lose our ability to do something while other nations gained the ability to do it is a blunder. Do you have any idea how many scientists and engineers are being bred in China right now because their space program is a front and center national priority?

  7. From last night’s CNN/YouTube Republican Debate (I promise this is the last comment taking this thread off-topic).

    “Steve Nielson: My name is Steve Nielson. And this question comes to you from Denver, Colorado. JFK’s vision put a man on the moon from a nonexistent space program in about seven years. The new vision for space exploration has provided about 15 years for that same feat. Meanwhile, Congress is pulling funding for human-to-Mars research altogether. Is there a candidate amongst you willing to take a pledge on behalf of the Mars Society of sending an American to the surface of Mars by 2020? If not, what is your vision for human space exploration?

    Cooper: Governor Huckabee?

    NASA pumps some — let’s see, how many — $5 billion into Florida’s economy.

    Huckabee: Whether we ought to go to Mars is not a decision that I would want to make, but I would certainly want to make sure that we expand the space program, because every one of us who are sitting here tonight have our lives dramatically improved because there was a space program — whether it’s these screens that we see or the incredible electronics that we use, including the GPS systems that got many of you to this arena tonight.

    (Laughter)

    Some of you were late because you didn’t have one, by the way. Or whether it’s the medical technologies that saved many of our lives or the lives or our families, it’s the direct result of the space program, and we need to put more money into science and technology and exploration. Now, whether we need to send somebody to Mars, I don’t know. But I’ll tell you what: If we do, I’ve got a few suggestions, and maybe Hillary could be on the first rocket to Mars.

    (Laughter)

    Cooper: Congressman Tancredo, 30 seconds, please.

    Tancredo: The question is a serious one and it deserves a serious answer, and that is this: Look, we’ve been — how many times up here, how many questions have dealt with the issue of deficit spending, the debt out of control? And yet, we have somebody saying, “But would you spend more money on going to Mars?” And the suggestion that we need to spend more money on space exploration. This is it, folks. That’s why we have such incredible problems with our debt, because everybody’s trying to be everything to all people. We can’t afford some things, and by the way, going to Mars is one of them.”

  8. Libertarianism will always fail to rule a society.

    How do you know this? It’s never been tried before…

    When it comes to their own stuff or their aspirations or inspirations they suddenly don’t feel so Libertarian

    I couple of examples would be nice..

    M. Nam

  9. NASA pumps some — let’s see, how many — $5 billion into Florida’s economy.

    And how much do the tax-payers pump into NASA budget? :)

  10. i skimmed through the comments, so i apologize if this was already discussed; but does anyone else find de la renta’s comments kind of annoying? ““She is an unbelievably feminine and gentle person, but at the same time she can accomplish so much”. how exactly are feminity and gentleness exclusive from accomplishment? why the need for the word but? maybe it seems like i’m overanalyzing, but the subtlety of words is powerful…

    That annoyed me too. Old school patronizing sexism.

  11. Re #116

    >>Libertarianism will always fail to rule a society. How do you know this? It’s never been tried before…

    I realise that this is off topic, but I can’t resist the following observation. On a bad day, I wish that a Libertarian revolution takes place in the U.S. Chances are that, over a period of, say, a century, the nation’s arch-Libertarians would have presided over such a thorough rape and plunder of a once-proud society that we would no longer have to waste resources arguing about whether Libertarianism is good or bad. Look… Libertarianism is an ideology, and one cannot organise a large, heterogeneous, pluralistic society on the basis of an ideology.

    Need I remind readers of SM about what a tragic mess resulted when the principles of minimal government collided with Hurricane Katrina ? (Of course, shit-and-run tacticians such as Toomar Nam will have a nice Adlerian defence of what happened.)

    The concept of minimal government may not a bad one when one considers its impact streamlining small-bore socio-economic services. But Libertarians have no convincing arguments on how the excesses of the Gilded Age can be avoided without state intervention; i.e. I see no arguments that do not boil down to some sort of econo-babble involving the Homo economicus and the Nash equilibrium!

    I couple of examples would be nice..

    Long-Island-based Libertarian mavens-cum-parents who staunchly oppose the War on Marijuana, and support putting more blacks into jail ;-)

  12. GB:

    I realise that this is off topic,

    Not entirely. We are talking about the elections, and the Libertarian Ron Paul has been quite prominent.

    Chances are that, over a period of, say, a century, the nation’s arch-Libertarians would have presided over such a thorough rape and plunder of a once-proud society …Of course, shit-and-run tacticians such as Toomar Nam

    If you want to be taken seriously, try not to use hyperbole doomsday scenarios and word play with posters’ names.

    Long-Island-based Libertarian mavens-cum-parents who staunchly oppose the War on Marijuana, and support putting more blacks into jail ;-)

    I oppose the war on drugs as well – it’s not the government’s job to regulate private consumption.

    As regards to the second – I’ve never heard of any Libertarian who’s a racist.

    Libertarianism is an ideology, and one cannot organise a large, heterogeneous, pluralistic society on the basis of an ideology

    The whole idea of Libertarianism is that nobody has the right to organise societies – people should be left to themselves to exercise their free will to survive and prosper.

    M. Nam

  13. Ooooops…. Comment #120:

    Long-Island-based Libertarian mavens-cum-parents who staunchly oppose the War on Marijuana, and support putting more blacks into jail ;-)

    should read as: Long-Island-based Libertarian mavens-cum-parents who staunchly support the War on Marijuana, and support putting more blacks into jail ;-) Satisfied, M. Nam!?! And Moor Nam, baby, what’s with all your the selective quotation, eh ?

    >>Chances are that, over a period of, say, a century, the nation’s arch-Libertarians would have presided over such a thorough rape and plunder of a once-proud society …Of course, shit-and-run tacticians such as Toomar Nam If you want to be taken seriously, try not to use hyperbole doomsday scenarios and word play with posters’ names.

    Hurricane Katrina wasn’t doomsday, I agree. But close enough… to those affected by it.

  14. Libertarians are like feminists, anti-communists, and civil-rights activists. They’re such idealists that they have a hard time realizing they’ve won. At the moment everyone embraces their philosophy, they move the goalposts. Libertarianism, or classic liberalism if you will, is the dominant political ideology of our time. America is about as libertarian as the Soviets were communist. Which is to say these respective revolutions are/were far from complete, but dominant nonetheless.

    Nothng annoys idealists more than success.

  15. Manju,

    You’re advocating a Reaganesque approach to Liberteranism – we can’t get everything, so let’s get what we can. I’m fine with that approach as well, hence my support for Giuliani/Huckabee/RonPaul.

    M. Nam

  16. Giuliani/Huckabee/RonPaul

    Huckabee is libertarian? Do you know anything about Huckabee?

    Giuliani is an authoritarian, not a libertarian. If you are looking for libertarians, Ron Paul and Fred Thompson are probably your best bets.

  17. Huckabee is libertarian? Do you know anything about Huckabee?

    He’s a fiscal conservative. Wants to repeal the income tax, abolish the IRS and opposes any tax increases for Social Security.

    If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck…

    M. Nam

  18. I oppose the war on drugs as well – it’s not the government’s job to regulate private consumption.

    Simultaneously one has to be wary of what kind of elements it allows to run rampant in society. Look at all the people harmed or killed via drunk driving. We know that hard drugs like cocaine and herione do ruin and kill individuals, their families, their entire neighborhoods. Infants are even born addicted to the stuff if the mother is a junkie. So how to regulate that? How to stop it? Should the people just be left alone to ruin themselves? To wipe out their own families and communities?

  19. The government can stop the flow of coke and herion in this country if it really wanted to.

    I can’t help but think the government has a hand in it, CIA, or whatever.

  20. I know Huma and have had the pleasure of working for her [(remember, A N N A? :) ]. She is a world class political mind, which doesn’t quite come through from the superficial coverage she has received. Then again, who truly is shocked that Vogue’s focus would be on her beauty/presence over skill. She’s far, far more than a bodyperson–she’s HRC’s Travelling Chief of Staff, managing “the road show” and all involved with the senator’s events. Kind of luck the ringmaster of a circus on wheels. Doubly impressive when you realize how young she is.

  21. He’s a fiscal conservative. Wants to repeal the income tax, abolish the IRS and opposes any tax increases for Social Security.

    I’m not sure you will find the following very libertarian. Here is what the national review had to say:

    “However, with the passage of time, Governor Huckabee’s star dimmed considerably with economic conservatives. By the end of his second term he had raised sales taxes 37 percent, fuel taxes 16 percent, and cigarettes taxes 103 percent, leading to a jump in total tax revenues from $3.9 billion to $6.8 billion. The Cato Institute gave him a failing grade of ‘F’ on its fiscal report card for 2006 and an only marginally better but still embarrassing ‘D’ for his entire term.”

    Not to mention his hands on approach on religious issues to get it more involved in government with support for creationism, anti choice and anti gay rhetoric.

    Sorry about the diversion, as to this thread I think Huma is a lot more adept at her job than people here are willing to give her credit for.

  22. I’ll tell you what. Let’s do away with all museums while we are at it. We could feed hungry children with that money. Also, lets get rid of the symphony. Who will think of the children? Taking money from one of the biggest educators of children (especially science and math) to fund the technical education of children (who now don’t have a cool job to aspire to) is plainly stupid.

    Are “all museums” and “all symphonies” really equivalent to “a manned mission to the Moon and, hey while we’re at it, maybe Mars”? Of course NASA is an important priority. Of course it has a major educational function. But I don’t think its educational function is so great that it trumps actual schools. American public schools are distressed and are largely segregated between races (and, to a lesser degree, economic classes) because we stupidly base our educational funding on property taxes. So even distributing the cost of one of those shuttle launches (let alone a whole manned mission to the Moon) to underfunded schools could make a big difference.

    Disbanding NASA as some of the libertarians want to do is absolutely stupid. But being unyielding about its budget in the face of competing policy demands is pretty stupid too, IMHO.

  23. As a female, I find it refreshing to have a woman in politics who doesn’t look like a sharpei (esp one so high up). People always separate intelligence and hotness, why can’t we have both?! It’s too bad she sided with Hillary tho, I don’t think we’re quite ready for a woman yet. (another 4 yrs maybe?)

  24. It’s too bad she sided with Hillary tho, I don’t think we’re quite ready for a woman yet. (another 4 yrs maybe?)

    CC, I’m curious. What according to you will happen in 4 years* that’ll make it a possibility? And who are these “we” I keep hearing about who are not ready for a female prez? :)

    Seems like a (media) sound-bite that’s echoed and amplified by people. Or maybe they’re not ready for a female prez, and use the all-inclusive term “we” to avoid saying “I.” What do you think? I hear from plenty of folks who say they are ready for a female prez, though pause and reconsider if the hypothetical scenario of Condi as a candidate comes up.

    • We’ve had Geraldine Ferrero in 1984, and Winona LaDuke in 2000 as Veep candidates.
  25. People, always good to see an off spring of South Asian parents making their mark in America. Yes she is attractive, and of course that in itself is a source of power. And she is intelligent, the daughter of two professors?

    In America the President doesn’t make all the decisions solely, but the powerful groups and lobbies around the President who have access to his ear. Bush/Annapolis/Jewish lobby/American foreign policy—-decided by Israel—imbalance and insecurity in the world. Senator Clinton is senator for NY, and that is where her power and strength is derived from (The Jewish lobby), and the constituency she has to answer to ultimately on all the critical questions that matter. Senator Clinton comes across as one who is in the hands of the Jewish lobby, and as a personal character trait, I find her rather too cynical. Though the prospect of the first women as American president is tantalizing. One token very young inexperienced women of South Asian decent isn’t going to make much of a difference to this huge political construction I have just talked about above, which harms America and ultimately the world.

    Now of course there is Ron Paul. The man may have principles, and rare for a politician, means what he says. He WILL bring the troops back home, and stop them fighting Israel’s wars. He is not managed by the Jewish lobby, though I have detected him playing their games just a little—’it’s OK’if it is at a superficial level, I can live with it——-The point is he will be good for America, and the world. No he doesn’t appoint token persons in certain positions as a tactical manouver; I don’t think he is that cynical.

  26. Human and Hillary are banging or scissoring as they say on South Park.

    Then maybe the appropriate Battlestar Galactica analogy is actually Gina/Admiral Cain?

    Sorry. :)

    Libertarians are like feminists, anti-communists, and civil-rights activists. They’re such idealists that they have a hard time realizing they’ve won.

    Feminism won? So, um, why are we having this whole conversation about how a woman who is objectified, posed in evening gowns in fashion magazines, and not taken politically seriously despite her political/career achievements? And who works in a campaign in which the female candidate (whom I don’t support for a variety of reasons) is being referred to by Republicans almost exclusive as ‘the Bitch’? Yeah, glad we got rid of sexism. I mean, it’s great that we’ve gotten to the point where a rich woman whose husband was President can be a serious contender, but look at the lives of working class women and women of color and talk to me about how feminism is over.

  27. Awesome! I’m so glad I don’t have to worry about rape and domestic violence anymore!

    look sarah, we libertarians and anti-communists feel your pain. everywhere we look, we see the gulags coming back: farc guerillas, hugo chavez, naxalites, hillary clinton…

    but the world will never be perfect, human nature won’t change, people will always want something for nothing, sex and violence will always be intertwined, the poor will always be among us.

    but within these truths we have our little revolutions. and they are not insignificant but neither are they perfect. yours is winning, as is mine…but they will never be complete…because when we try to complete them, we’ll become that which we fight.

  28. Yep, I point out real sexism and get condescension in response… I suppose I’ve proven your point and you’ve proven mine.

  29. Yep, I point out real sexism and get condescension in response

    sarah, i certainly wasn’t rying to condescend toward you anymore than i was toward libertarians, of which i am more or less one. but i guess my comment took on a soothsayerish feel, in which a superiority complex is inevitable.

    well, as manju-the-shaman may i say your revolution and mine are one in the same. i pass you the peacepipe.

  30. I’m so glad I don’t have to worry about rape and domestic violence

    Someone did remark about moving the goalposts.

  31. Just for the record, she wouldn’t be the FIRST desi in the Oval Office. Two of her peers come to mind – - Dina Habib Powell (Bush’s headhunter)

    Just for the record, Powell is not desi. She is Egyptian. Also, Neera has a less influential role that Huma.

  32. Huma! Wah!

    She is perfect close up – but I don’t think Bill will make any move on Huma if Hilary is Pres. Also we certainly need to have more desis in power – everywhere! Huma will lead the charge, hey by the way isn’t she already hitched was this Abbasi chap from the UK?

  33. Alright, Huma’s a 9.875 on the 1-10 scale and I think that’s pretty dang obvious. And…she’s also very quick witted, another big plus for a future Chief of Staff. Together, however, these attributes, pairing a sharp mind with a beautiful and persuasive countenance, she could actually become quite powerful. And, as for the rumors of an affair with Hillary, who cares? It’s got to be pretty tough and lonely out there on the campaign trail. Why not share a little comfort? Certainly, Bill wouldn’t object. He’d be the one with the video camera.

    …Looking forward to getting the Clintons back in the White House (and Huma too).